Health

The Enhanced Baby Bundle

“This project has the potential to impact 178,000 births every year in the Carolinas.”

“This project has the potential to impact 178,000 births every year in the Carolinas.”

Healthy maternity care practices are essential to ensuring the well-being of mothers and babies.

Thanks to awards from The Duke Endowment totaling $5 million, ENRICH Carolinas, run by the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute (CGBI) housed in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, will expand across North and South Carolina. 

ENRICH Carolinas is a project that supports hospitals in improving maternity care practices for mothers and babies.

“Our vision is to make sure that every family is provided the support that they need to achieve their feeding goals,” said Catherine Sullivan, CGBI’s director, ENRICH Carolina’s principal investigator, and an assistant professor of maternal and child health at the Gillings School. “This project has the potential to impact 178,000 births every year in the Carolinas.”

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UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health

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