Entrepreneurship

Risk and Reward

"When you decide to open a business — you don't really have a choice but to succeed."

"When you decide to open a business — you don't really have a choice but to succeed."

“It was very scary. You’re out there. There is nobody to blame — when you decide to do that, to step out, open a business, put your kids’ names on the door — you don’t really have a choice but to succeed.”

For Frank Andrews ’90, leaving his job to start his own communications firm, The August Jackson Company, was a significant risk. He was 35 years old with two young sons, and was under the pressure of providing for his family.

He is now leaving a legacy for this entrepreneurial spirit at the UNC School of Media and Journalism. 

Read the complete Carolina Story from the UNC School of Media and Journalism…Opens in new window

This is story number 80 in the Carolina Stories 225th Anniversary Edition magazine.

The Frank Andrews Fund for Aspiring Agency Entrepreneurs aims to foster entrepreneurship in MJ-School students through a series of events, competitions and outreach efforts to nurture innovative thinking in students and to shine a light on outstanding MJ-school faculty and alumni.

UNC School of Media and Journalism Funding Priorities

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