Student Support

Seeing the world from a different perspective

"The biggest thing I learned in Korea was how to see the world from someone else's perspective."

"The biggest thing I learned in Korea was how to see the world from someone else's perspective."

“The biggest thing I learned in Korea was how to see the world from someone else’s point of view. People who had a different upbringing from me taught me the most about life… that there is no correct way to live it.” —Ntiense Inyang ’16

Since 2006, the Phillips Ambassadors program — created by Carolina alumnus and former U.S. ambassador Earl N. “Phil” Phillips and his family — has supported study abroad experiences in Asia for more than 300 students — igniting new passions, creating career opportunities and changing life trajectories.

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This is story number 36 in the Carolina Stories 225th Anniversary Edition magazine.

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