Faculty Support

Enjoying the fun in science

“Not knowing too much is a good thing. The unknown creates fun moments in the lab.”

“Not knowing too much is a good thing. The unknown creates fun moments in the lab.”

“Not knowing too much is a good thing. The unknown creates fun moments in the lab.”

As a child, Nancy Allbritton wanted to be a physicist, or some sort of scientist. Now a leading researcher in developing new technologies for biomedical applications, she leads the UNC/NC State Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering. She also encourages up-and-coming female researchers to work hard and enjoy the fun in science.

Read the complete Carolina Story from Endeavors…Opens in new window

Nancy AllbrittonOpens in new window is the Kenan Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Chemistry and chair of the UNC/NC State Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering. Her research focuses on using techniques from chemistry, physics, engineering and materials science to develop new technologies for biomedical applications.

This is story number 218 in the Carolina Stories 225th Anniversary Edition magazine.

 

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