Innovation

Elevating Carolina Chemistry

When Royce Murray arrived at Carolina, there were less than 15 chemistry faculty members...

When Royce Murray arrived at Carolina, there were less than 15 chemistry faculty members...

When Royce Murray arrived at Carolina in 1960, the Department of Chemistry’s faculty numbered fewer than 15, and all worked from labs in the sprawling ranch-style Venable Hall. There were two National Academy of Sciences (NAS) members in the department, and Murray — an analytical chemist with research interests in electrochemistry, molecular design and sensors — brought that number to five by 1991. Along the way, Murray amassed just about every major honor in his field, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, plus fellowships in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, as well as being named editor of the preeminent journal in his field,Analytical Chemistry. Murray Hall on campus bears his name, thanks in large part to one of his former students — Lowry Caudill, who completed his senior research in Murray’s lab. Today, faculty members, including Bo Li, pictured, continue to build on Murray’s legacy.

Read the complete Carolina Story from the UNC College of Arts & Sciences…Opens in new window

The Department of Chemistry in the UNC College of Arts & Sciences celebrates its 200th anniversary in 2018.

Photo by Steve Exum.

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