Innovation

A Homecoming for a Convergent Scientist

When it comes to convergent science, Caleb King is the man to lead the way.

Caleb King

When it comes to convergent science, Caleb King is the man to lead the way.

Caleb King ’82 is back in his hometown of Chapel Hill to lead the UNC Institute for Convergent Science.

A university of the people and for the people, Carolina has been a hub of research and innovation since its beginning. With the world constantly changing and technology increasingly advancing, the Chapel Hill community has the opportunity, now more than ever, to use its resources and intellectual know-how to leave a lasting impact through convergent science. 

The goal of the UNC Institute for Convergent Science is to break down barriers in academia and bring together researchers from various backgrounds to positively impact society, boost value for both researchers and Carolina, and create jobs across the state.

Carolina scientists are already using a convergent science approach in many research endeavors, but the people of UNC-Chapel Hill believe they can innovate smarter — and faster. With the framework for convergent science in place, an executive director is needed to turn this idea for an institute into a reality. The director needed to be someone who understands medicine, technology, engineering, entrepreneurship and economic development, not to mention the humanities and the workings of a large university.

In a world facing the ravages of climate change and exploding populations in need of food, clean water and energy, Caleb King, who spent 16 years rebuilding a war-torn hospital and developing a hydropower plant to supply it with electricity, is the man to lead the way.

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UNC Institute for Convergent Science Funding Priorities

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