Funding Priority

Unlock Autism Through Genetics

At UNC Autism Research Center, we are focused on better understanding the complexities of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) at the most fundamental level. By using genetics and phenotypic biomarkers to diagnose autism at a very early age, we can dramatically impact the trajectory of children’s lives.

UNC Autism Research Center

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates autism’s prevalence as 1 in 68 children in the United States, including 1 in 42 boys and 1 in 189 girls. At UNC Autism Research Center we are looking beyond the surface to delve deeper into the genetic make up of those with autism to diagnose and intervene earlier than ever before.

    The UNC Autism Registry— a critical tool in better understanding ASD — contains genetic material from more than 3,000 individuals. To realize the full potential of this genome sequencing, we must secure additional funds to build, manage and grow the registry to 5,000 individuals. With your support, we will continue to build knowledge and find solutions to autism’s most difficult issues.

     

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